Chronic Wasting Disease Fueled By Infectious Sewage Sludge

Biosolids Spreading Brain Disease To Wildlife

Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other forms of neurodegenerative disease are collectively becoming the leading cause of death around the world. Brain disease also continues to expand in wildlife. Is there a connection?

food safety and biosolids

Keep reading to find out why:

  • Alzheimer’s disease is an infectious prion disease;
  • Prion infectivity is in the bodily fluids of those with prion disease;
  • Wastewater treatment plants are spreading deadly prions via sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater.They also spread nuclear waste and toxic waste;
  • Wildlife are contracting prion disease from people because of this contamination. So are people. So are sea mammals.
  • Caregivers are in harm’s way because of widespread denial and mismanagement.
  • It’s time for several reforms. It’s time to reclassify biosolids and reclaimed wastewater as infectious waste. Prions are unstoppable. It’s time to enforce the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.

chronic wasting disease caused by sewage sludge

The Epidemic

Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now. Millions more will contract the disease this year, while just as many will go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

Thanks to misinformation and the mismanagement of infectious waste and bodily fluids, people of all ages are now exposed to an expanding spectrum of brain disease. So are other mammals.

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS and -Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, these brain diseases are part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible.

prion disease and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy

Prion disease also includes chronic wasting disease among cervids (deer) and mad cow disease among cattle. It’s been found in dozens of mammals.

Pandora’s Box

Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The bodily fluids of people with prion disease are infectious. Prions are the X factor in the global epidemic.

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. Prions are an infectious form of glycoprotein that can propagate throughout the body. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease. TSEs also have the potential of being transmitted from humans to animals. The most common example is chronic wasting disease (CWD) among deer species.

CWD was first detected in deer in North America. Then it was detected in a variety of other animals, including an elephant at the Oakland zoo. It’s been found in a variety of animals across the United States and Canada. All hypotheses seem to center around contaminated feed and deer farmers. Then the deer spread the disease via nose-to-nose contact. Those theories were just rocked by the discovery of CWD in Norway in moose and reindeer. The disease didn’t jump the Atlantic from the Americas. However, Norway dumps tons of infectious waste on land every year–infectious waste from people with prion disease.

biosolids and disease

It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when. The medical community prefers to ignore the topic. The legal industry is about to have a bonanza because negligence is the rule and not the exception regarding Alzheimer’s disease and the mismanagement of infectious waste. Savvy neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risks. Unfortunately, caregivers aren’t warned accordingly.

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Wastewater treatment doesn’t touch prions. In fact, these facilities are now helping incubate and distribute prions via solids and wastewater released. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. Unfortunately, the CDC quietly took prions off the list because the regulation criminalized entire industries and several reckless practices.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation.

Prions shed from humans are the most deadly. They demand more respect than radiation. They’re being ignored by regulators and industry alike. As such, food and water sources are being contaminated with the deadliest forms of prions. Municipal water systems can’t stop them from reaching water taps in millions of homes. Filtration doesn’t phase them.

Read The Full Story At: http://alzheimerdisease.tv/wildlife-contracting-brain-disease-from-humans/

issue management and public affairs and public relations

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

About Gary Chandler

Public affairs and sustainability consultant. Founder of Crossbow Communications. Follow him on Twitter @Gary_Chandler
This entry was posted in Environmental Issues, Environmental Policy, Health, Prion Disease and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *